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The greatest race on earth

26 11 2017

As many of you know, the USA BMX Grands are happening this weekend.

It’s a race often billed as the “greatest race on earth”.

So, like many race-y types, I tuned in to try to catch some of the “Pro show” Saturday night via the live feed.

Well, the feed was buggy and ultimately froze…so I bailed.

It got me thinking about the “greatest race on earth” catchphrase though.

For me, this Euro cruiser final would definitely be a top contender for “greatest race on earth”.

It’s got it all…thrills, spills, you name it…a wild ride from beginning to end.

I just can’t get tired of watching this.

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WTP Atlas gets race ready for 2018

12 09 2017

This is something I didn’t see coming.

At first glance, I thought the 2018 We The People Atlas would be a slightly refined version of their 2017 model.

Boy, was I wrong.

While they may be similar in color, this WTP Atlas has taken “race-inspired” to a whole other level…especially for a company that is, by and large, a freestyle company.

For 2018, the u-brake has been replaced by a more “race-y” v-brake. The wide, knobby trail tires ditched for 1.95 Kenda Konversions.

Even the sprocket has been upsized to 33 teeth!

But that’s not all, the geometry has also been changed to reflect its new race inspiration.

We’re talking longer chain stays and a lowered bottom bracket.

Check out the full breakdown below:

  • Head Tube Angle: 74°
  • Seat Tube Angle: 72.25°
  • Top Tube Length:  21.75”
  • Chain Stay Length: 15”
  • Bottom Bracket Height: 12.25”
  • Stand Over Height: 9.5”

All that, and it clocks in at just a smidge over 26 pounds. Pretty respectable for a full cro-mo race bike.

Heck, even the graphics seem race-oriented!

I’m kinda interested in how many of these we’re gonna end up seeing out in the gate  next year.

I know I’m kinda tempted by it.





Flying econo class in style with DK

9 09 2017

If you’re low on dough, new to riding or making a comeback to the sport, you might not be able to pick up the latest high-end cruiser with all the bells and whistles.

But even with that being the case, you still want a cool looking bike that’s fun to ride…you just have to do it on a budget.

If that sounds like you, DK has got you covered.

On the freestyle side of things, the 2018 DK Cygnus 24″ clocks in at around $360 US (complete!).

Built around a “chromoly main frame”, the Cygnus sports tall bars, 170 mm cranks and the choice of teal or beige colorways.

The geo looks pretty good too:

  • Head tube angle: 73.5º
  • Seat tube angle: 73º
  • Top tube: 21.5″
  • Chain stay: 14.75″
  • BB height: 12.6″

On the race side of things, the 2018 DK Sprinter Cruiser 24″ is also an excellent value for what you spend ($419.99 US).

Built around a 6061 alloy frame, 100% chromoly forks and double-wall rims, there’s a lot to like here.

The royal blue colorway with red ano accents looks pretty dialed too…more befitting of a bike with a much higher price tag, but extra cool to see on a bike at this price level!

The geo checks out on this one too:

  • Head tube angle: 73º
  • Seat tube angle: 72º
  • Top tube: 21.75″
  • Chain stay: 15.25″
  • BB height: not specified

All in all, some pretty cool rides for not a lot of dough.

Either one would be a perfect entry point to riding and both can be upgraded as the need arises and your skills progress. Definitely some solid choices if you find yourself wanting to fly in the economy class.





SX start hills to become VIP beer gardens?

16 06 2017

With the news that BMX freestyle had been added to the 2020 Tokyo Olympic program the BMX racing community is all a buzz with talk about the potential impact on BMX racing in upcoming Olympic events.

One big question to come out of this discussion?

Are the Olympics/Supercross(SX)-style tracks’ days numbered?

Signs are beginning to point to “yes”.

According to Mike Carruth on VintageBMX.com,

We are already seeing a gradual departure from the 8M hill, via the UCI rules for 2017, which allow World Cup races to be run off of 5M or 8M hills. To me, that is the beginning of the end for the 8M hill, but it is going to take a while. If BMX Racing gets dropped from the Olympics, as many expect in 2024 or 2028, that will further accelerate the demise of the 8M hill. By then, most of those hills will be 10 yrs old, and will have lived a full life.

But what will become of these massive –now more or less obsolete– structures in this non-SX BMX future?

Well, Carruth has a solid idea that I think we can all get behind:

Then, they [the 8M starting hills] can be converted to stadium seating, with a VIP beer garden at the top.

I think he may be on to something with this idea.

This might just return BMX racing to its former glory.

I say cheers to that.





Mongoose serious about racing comeback

31 05 2017

Back in December, we got word that Mongoose was making a racing comeback.

They kicked things off with a line of affordable, race-ready complete bikes that were available at mongoose.com and Amazon.

Now, it appears that Mongoose is upping the ante and expanding their race line —from four to eight models–for the 2018 model year.

According to a writeup in the Wisconsin State Journal, one reason for the expansion of their BMX category, specifically the race category, is the increased exposure BMX racing has received since its Olympic debut.

Another reason, according to Brian Baldis, Director of Product Development for Mongoose, is:

“…parents like to put their kids in those kind of formatted sports, versus freestyle, which is still the bulk of the BMX marketplace.

“Racing is seeing some uptick because it has a time, location, adult supervision and feels very much like Little League in that way. It’s been great for youths getting back on bikes in that way.”

That’s great to hear, considering the gloom and doom on Internet Forums over the past few years when the topic of participation rates came up.

Will this translate into more Mongooses at the local track?

Time will tell.

But in any event, it’s great to have this iconic brand back in the BMX race scene again.





A cruiser by any other name

29 05 2017

As many of you know, the BMX cruiser class had its orgins with the classic beach cruiser.

In fact, up until Craig Kundig (of RRS bikes) put one of his racers on a 24″, race cruisers were generally 26″ bikes.

Yet with the many changes and improvements made to 24″ race bikes over the ensuing decades, the “cruiser” moniker stuck.

BMX legend Eric Rupe was around for those early days (and has continued racing through to the present day) seems to think that the “cruiser” name should be changed.

In the recent PULL magazine “Cruiser Edition”, Rupe was quoted as saying the following:

An interesting take…yet granted, something I have also pondered.

It reminded me of a conversation I had a few years ago at Interbike.

I was talking to a vendor that produced beach cruiser-related accessories.

She saw that my tag read “Cruiser Revolution” and asked about it. I explained that my site covered “BMX cruisers” not the “beach cruisers” that she made parts for.

She got upset with me and said “those aren’t ‘cruisers’! You need to change your name.”

I laughed it off but she seemed a little too hung up on it so I moved along to another booth.

To me, while there definitely has been a revolution in the design and quality of modern-day BMX cruisers (see what I did there?) I think maintaining the “cruiser” name is a good thing…it reminds us of the how this type of bike came about but it also lets us redefine what it means as the years go on.





PULL magazine dedicates issue to Cruisers

17 05 2017

The May issue of Pull Magazine showed up on my doorstep yesterday (on #TwoFourTuesday appropriately enough).

I had been waiting on this one with some anticipation ever I since I got word that they would be dedicating the issue to Cruisers.

Drew Motley , 2016 National #1 Cruiser Champ,  graces the cover.

Inside, Motley also gets a fairly in-depth interview talking about a whole range of things, including how Motley bested the comp (at the Grands) with a belt drive.

Another big part of the issue is their list of the 40 most iconic cruisers.

I think they made the right call (at least from a racing perspective) for the #1 placeholder.

The RRS 24 was truly a game changer in the cruiser scene.

Craig Kundig’s decision to put one of his racers on a 24″ instead of the more commonplace 26″ bikes (of the time) truly set a new path for race cruisers.

However, I’m bit a surprised by what got left off the list…but I guess you need to generate a little controversy with the readership to get people talking about it.

Plenty of other cruiser-related stuff in the issue for you take a gander at too. I’ll let you check those out on your own.

All in all, a solid issue by PULL.

Nice to see them giving cruisers some love.