Subrosa/Slayer collaboration cruiser

30 04 2016

We’ve seen quite a few collaboration bikes over the years but this type of collaboration just feels so right….Subrosa and Slayer!

Subrosa has teamed up with Slayer to produce a line of bikes that includes a 26″ cruiser.

SlayerThese bikes have been designed with a look to represent the band –and its fans — as well as set up to hold up to some old-fashioned radness (to a degree, though…the frame on the cruiser is tri-moly).

Subrosa Slayer 26In terms of geometry/frame specs, the Slayer 26 features:

  • Head Angle: 72 degrees
  • Seat Angle: 73 degrees
  • Top tube: 22″
  • Chain stay: 16.5″
  • Stand over: 14.75″
  • Bottom bracket height: not disclosed at press time

I’m digging on the graphics and colorway though.

Subrosa Slayer 26 partsWatch for these to drop some time in October.

For more on the Subrosa/Slayer collaboration, check out their issu lookbook.

(All pics: Subrosa)

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Sutty’s custom Invictus, all built up

26 04 2016

Roy “Sutty” Sutton gave us a sneak peek a few weeks back of his custom Invictus Bikes cruiser frame.

It was an eye-catcher with a slack* head angle, long top tube, short rear stays and...to top things off….it was fitted for a disc brake.

I couldn’t wait to see it all built up.

Well, it took a while but we finally have a pic of his bike put together.

It looks pretty trick.

Invictus Sutty build

Now, we just need to convince him to send some riding shots!

*I think we might be on the cusp of a bona fide trend in cruisers with slacker head angles for the dirt-jumping crowd (just look at the Commonground frame for another example) .

 





Lairdframe celebrates its 200th frame

21 04 2016

Mike Laird made a name for myself as a BMX Pro but these days he spends most of his time making high-end custom frames that bear his name.

And those frames might just end up having a bigger impact on the riding community than his pro career ever did.

Still riding at a high level but retired from the contest scene, Mike has turned his attention to building the best custom frames he can for all types of riders.

We’ve featured a couple of Lairdframes in the past and have always been blown away.

Lairdframe26

Now with the milestone of the 200th frame reached (with a special one-off for himself)…it’s a good time to check out this video Mike put together a few months ago.

It walks through the journey Mike took from getting into riding, turning Pro and transitioning into a custom frame builder.

Check it out.

 





Yess introduces belt drive cruiser

19 04 2016

The Yess BMX belt drive race bike, powered by the Gates Carbon Drive system, got a lot of hype last year.

It was definitely a big departure from conventional BMX drive trains.

When I finally got a chance to give it a once-over at Interbike, I was impressed. At the same time, I thought to myself, “I doubt they’ll ever get around to making a cruiser version.”

Well, as it turns out….Yess did get around to making a cruiser version.

BMXNews.com dropped the news over the weekend.

yess belt drive cruiser

It will be offered as a complete, kitted out with BOX components, Arisun Tires and a specially-fitted-for-Carbon Drive Onyx rear hub. (Check the full parts breakdown over at BMXNews.com)

Drivetrain Deets 

  • 50-tooth Gates Carbon Drive System Ring (Aluminum)
  • Rear Cog: 22-tooth Gates Carbon Drive System Pulley (Aluminum)
  • Belt: 108-tooth Gates Carbon Drive
  • Gear ratio 1 : 2.27 (which is similar to 41/18)

yess belt drive 24

List price is $2900 ($US, I believe) with a $200 discount incentive if you purchase before May.

Great to see the latest in BMX tech (like this and the 24″ carbon Speedco frame) making its way to the cruiser class.

(All pics: BMXNews.com)





McGoo reaches for some Commonground

18 04 2016

Seemingly right on the heels of our last post on Commonground Bikes (Finding that Commonground), an industry icon has thrown his support behind the Commonground concept.

Who is this industry icon you ask?

(If the headline didn’t give it away…)

It’s none other than Harold “McGoo” McGruther.

In a pair of Instagram posts today (here and here), McGruther talks a bit about his personal history riding/racing cruisers and what impact a trails-oriented 24 like the Commonground could have on the big-wheeled BMX scene.

Here’s a couple of tidbits from his posts:

…Commonground [‘s] 24″ seeks to bridge the gap between a BMX bike’s diminutive scale and an MTB’s complexity and cost to give grown-ass men a bike they can ride like they may have ridden in their teens and 20s, before wives, kids and desk jobs set in

If Pro BMX racing hadn’t become a clipped-in gym rat’s game at the turn of last century, I’d like to believe guys like Chris Moeller, @brianfoster, @ecmtb1 and Travis @commongroundbikes would have pushed race machinery in a bigger, faster, more bulletproof direction.

I secretly pine for what might have been had guys like Mike Day, Robbie Miranda and Brian [Foster]* gotten aboard the big bike train.

IMHO there is another good argument for grown men riding bigger bikes: fewer feckless members of the peanut gallery would look down on our sport’s greatest athletes as merely “old men on kid’s bikes.” I personally despise that opinion and comparison, but sometimes perception IS reality.

…Fortunately, BMX dirt jumpers and MTB-mounted "freeriders" did accelerate the evolution of terrain, to the point where a 6-year-old expert has a difficult time just walking the course. Bike riding of this nature is a man's game, and it demands real equipment. Enter @commongroundbikes. Travis Engel is a mountain biker who probably cut his all-terrain teeth on a BMX bike in his younger days, but understands the limitations of 20-inch wheel size, coaster-brake derived 110mm dropout spacing, and uber-twitchy 74+ degree head angles at higher speeds. His Commonground 24" seeks to bridge the gap between a BMX bike's diminutive scale and an MTB's complexity and cost to give grown ass men a bike they can ride like they may have ridden in their teens and 20's, before wives, kids and desk jobs set in. Commonground uses established BMX fabricators @fbmbikecompany and @sandmbmx to produce their framesets and handlebars, then picks spec from an eclectic mix of MTB and BMX suppliers to build the whole. While I haven't ridden a Commonground 24 personally, I love Travis's passion and gumption enough to buy one, and will be picking it up when I meet its maker next Wednesday. If Pro BMX racing hadn't become a clipped-in gym rat's game at the turn of last century, I'd like to believe guys like Chris Moeller, @brianfoster, @ecmtb1 and Travis @commongroundbikes would have pushed race machinery in a bigger, faster, more bulletproof direction. I remember the Blue Falcon's podium ride at the 2001 X Games DHBMX like it was 15 years ago, and I still secretly pine for what might have been had guys like @mday365, @robbiemiranda and Brian gotten aboard the big bike train. @ryannyquist has finally jumped on a FSMTB, and I think doing so will add years if not a decade to his illustrious cycling career. IMHO there is another good argument for grown men riding bigger bikes: fewer feckless members of the peanut gallery would look down on our sport's greatest athletes as merely "old men on kid's bikes." I personally despise that opinion and comparison, but sometimes perception IS reality.

A post shared by Harold McGruther (@haroldmcgruther) on

This isn’t the first time that McGruther has commented on “progressive 24s.”

You might recall a post from some years back, An army of giants take over the trails, where McGruther (using a Mirraco 24 as a jumping off point) talked about the number of core companies jumping into the 24 market (this was back in ’09).

At the time, he summed the situation up quite aptly by saying,

All we know for sure is this: 24-inch BMX bikes are fun to ride, and that’s good enough for us.

Couldn’t have said it better myself.

Postscript:

This just in…Brian Foster has jumped aboard the “big bike train“…to a degree, at least…in a surprise announcement — via Instagram — BF dropped the bomb that he was experimenting with an 22″ S&M ATF…and FIT would be releasing a 22″ Brian Foster complete in the new year.

Yowza!





Finding that Commonground

14 04 2016

Back in December, we had a look at Commonground Bikesuncommon approach to the 24.

As you might recall, rather than taking the well-trodden path of many other companies…that is, scaling up a bigger version of 20″ geometry…Commonground took a different approach.

Commonground borrowed elements of 26″ dirtjumpers (slack headtubes, low bottom brackets) and scaled it down to a 24″ version (while still retaining many familiar “BMX-y” elements).

Have a look at that previous post if you want to see how the Commonground setup compares, side-by-side, to a typical BMX cruiser.

Commonground still

Of course, words and images are great but it’s always nice to see how a bike works “in the field”…or in this case, at the trails.

As luck would have it, Commonground dropped a video edit today that explains a bit more about the Commonground concept along with some good riding action.

Check it out.

Bonus section: the filmer seemed to really, really like the Commonground frame.

Shot some stuff for @commongroundbikes but I could only stay serious for so long… #traillife #actorlife #comedy

A post shared by Taylor Calmus (@dudedadvlog) on

 





Can’t get over this over-crankslide

12 04 2016

Hard to believe this clip was put out way back in ’09.

I’m still pretty stoked on it though.

Jim Cielencki with an over-crankslide on the OG Sunday Model-C.

So much goodness!

Can't get over this over-crankslide! @jimcielencki getting some back in '09! #twofourtuesday #cruiserrevolution #24inchbmx

A post shared by Fast Eddie (@darealcruiserrevolution) on

JimC crankslideC