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Supercross set to release 24″ carbon frame

28 10 2019

Supercross BMX dropped the big news over the weekend.

A 24″ version of the carbon ENVY BLK 2 is in production. (In fact, team riders already have them in their hands!)

It’s been a while since we’ve seen a race company take the leap and bring their 24s into the carbon fold (Was Prophecy BMX the last one? No wait, it was Speedco ).

This is a good looking ride.

Based on their 20″ version, I think we’re going to see some positive reviews when people get their hands on these.

Starting off with one size for now, the Pro XL (which sports a 22″ top tube)  seems a smart move, due to the tooling costs of carbon. It will allow Supercross to gauge demand and refine it (if need be) before jumping to other sizes.

It’s a bit spendy at $1395 US for the frame but then again all carbon frames are…and if you’re looking for the ultimate in race performance, sometimes  you have to pay the toll to rock n’ roll.

You can check out the specs and the rest of the details over on the Supercross BMX site.

In the mean time, I’m hoping to see one these rigs in action when one of their team riders unleashes it at an upcoming National.

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Take a chrome Speedwagon home

19 04 2017

And now to add a bit more sizzle to the souped up S&M Speedwagon 24S&M has dropped the chrome version!

Hot damn, this looks good.

I’m kinda sweatin’ this frame now.

Check the previous post for more details on the updated Speedwagon 24…and of course, hit up your S&M dealer to score one of these bad boys.

 

(Pics: Cheap Goods BMX)





S&M soups up the Speedwagon 24

6 04 2017

Chris Moeller wanted a little more clearance to run bigger sprockets on his race cruiser…so as any good bike company owner would do…he redesigned S&M’s flagship race cruiser, the 24″ Speedwagon!

We got the first inklings of this when Moeller teased a sneak peek pic of the prototype on his Instagram page.

He said wanted to be able to run 42-18 gearing, so he incorporated a monostay into the frame to let him do it (making it somewhat similar to the old 38 Special design).

He followed that up with a closeup pic of the monostay a day later (love me some trans red!)

Now, word on the street is…they’re already available!

You can get them in clear, black, trans blue and trans red!

A chrome option is also slated for arrival in a few weeks.

Hot damn.

 

(Pics: Chris Moeller, Cheap Goods BMX)





First look: 2017 Chase Edge Cruiser

5 08 2016

The Chase Edge Cruiser is back in black for 2017 with pops of “Chase Blue” throughout the bike.

It features a hydroformed 6061 T6 Alloy frame and Chase Edge tapered leg cro-mo forks.

New this year is a new 90-points-of-engagement sealed bearing cassette hub and a smattering of other good stuff like 180mm Chase Edge alloy cranks and Tioga PowerBlock/PowerBand tires.

edge2017-cruiser-profil

Have a peek below for the relevant specs:

  • Head angle: 74°
  • Seat angle: 71°
  • Top tube: 21.5″
  • Chain stay: 14.5″
  • BB height: 12″




First look: 2017 SE Floval Flyer

20 07 2016

The SE Floval Flyer has been a perennial favorite around here since we first tested the flagship race cruiser from SE so many years ago.

And with new SE models slowly being rolled out, we’ve been waiting anxiously to see what the 2017 model would look like.

Well, the pictures are out and it looks great.

There’s definitely some shiny goodness here.

2017 SE Floval Flyer

Weighing in at a more-than-respectable 22.7 lbs…this complete looks ready to race.

The bike is kitted it out with Alienation rims, Tioga Powerblock tires, Promax brakes & stem, and a lightweight Pivotal seat/seatpost setup.

Built around built around a 6066 aluminum frame (with the distinctive “floval”  bi-oval downtube), internally-machined integrated head tube and 3D-forged dropouts…it’s hard to go wrong here.

2017 SE Floval Flyer front closeup

And if you’re wondering about the decals over the welds…they’re under the clear coat. They’re not going anywhere.

List price is $699 (US).

Time to start bugging your SE dealer.

(All pics: SE Bikes)





S&M Bruiser bars: bigger is better

6 05 2014

Could this be a sign that the sub-6″ cruiser bar is finally on its way out?

I have harped on the topic of traditional cruiser bars before…that they are just too small/short…but if you visit just about any race track, they are still being used by many folks (albeit usually with a topload stem and a whack of spacers).

But maybe that’s changing.

S&M just announced their new Bruiser Bar: 6.5″ tall and 29″ wide.  Available in black, white and chrome.

Bruiser bars sandm bikesGranted, if you’re rolling on a new school freestyle 24, you wouldn’t consider this a big bar (higher BBs and taller bars are the standard M.O. there) but for the race community this is a big step up…a lot of race completes still come with 5″ bars.

Hopefully, this will start a bit of a movement in the race community toward bigger bars.

Nice work S&M.

 





Tested: Tall bars on a race cruiser

26 08 2011

A while back the post titled, Traditional cruiser bars: who needs ’em generated a lot of discussion about the trend towards taller bars on 24″ BMX bikes. Part of that discussion also noted how the trend hadn’t really taken hold in the race community.

Racer, BMXActionOnline moderator and today’s guest tester, Matt Shelley thought the idea of taller bars on a race bike was a good one and decided to check it out for himself.

Here’s what he had to say:

The tall bars garnered a lot of interest at the races I attended, and most racers seemed positive toward the idea and feel. The local hot shot, nationally ranked in both 20” and cruiser, balked at the idea, insisting both bikes need to be set up with identical heights and reach. A rider who really liked the feel of my bike replied “all well and good, but if you only ride a cruiser, that rule simply doesn’t apply.”

A concern I had with the test was comparing my “apples” to “oranges”. Stack heights and stems vary from bike to bike, so bar height is not the final word in overall height. I decided I would measure from the top of the headset bearing. Whether internal or cup, this seemed like an appropriate starting point, and the middle of the grip area would be the end point.

Below is my main race bike. The bars are 5.75 inches, and the overall height is 7.5 inches.


I’ve been running this setup for close to 2 years now. It seems typical of most race cruisers and feels pretty good to me.

Here is a picture of a Quad that I recently set up. The bars are 7.5 inches with an overall height on 9 inches.

I’ve raced this bike 3 times now, and two 2nds and a 1st have been the result. After the initial half hour of  “this feels different,” I did not notice the bars much after that. I felt that they gave me better pull when manualing and hopping over jumps, and I got the impression I had much better pump with them on backsides.

Another advantage of the taller bars was leg room. I’m 6 feet tall with an inseam of 33 inches. The 6 inch bars I ran on the quad had to be rotated a bit forward, as I felt they were a little too close to my knees. With the 7.5 bars I can now run them in line with the fork.

The only area I felt these  bars to be too tall was out of the gate. I was now standing taller, and thus could not get all of the “give ‘em” out of my hips and into the pedal that I am used too. Aside from those first few pedals, no other detrimental effects on the track were noticed.

I’m now planning to boost the overall height on my main rig to 8 inches. This should give me that better pull and pump I felt, and still allow for a powerful feeling out of the gate.

So taller bars on a race cruiser? Hey, if it feels good… do it!