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90s-era BMX shirts at Urban Outfitters

14 01 2019

Have 90s-era BMX t-shirts finally crossed the rubicon into hipster fashion?

Signs are pointing to yes.

Reports are coming out saying that Urban Outfitters stores are now stocking shirts from GT, Dyno, Mongoose and Schwinn.

I first spotted them on Brian Tunney’s Instagram:

Apparently they are put out by a company called ourlegendsauthentic.

Will they be hit with hipster millennials who were kids when these brands/logos were big?

Tough to say.

For myself, I used to sweat some of the earlier Dyno designs…the fish shoes, tragically hip shirt, etc.

 


If those designs start showing up…well, this aging Gen-Xer might be elbowing those hipster millennials out of the way for some new shirts.

 

(B&W pics: vintage-bmx-ads.blogspot.com)

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Back In Black: 2019 Colony Eclipse 24

19 12 2018

Colony BMX just dropped the deets on their 2019 lineup and their 24″ freestyle machine, the Eclipse, is back in the lineup.

Departing from the somewhat flashy red colorway of 2018, 2019 sees Colony going back to their roots, so to speak, with a black colorway reminiscent of the look it sported when it debuted into the Colony lineup (in 2015).

Colony has stuck with the same geometry from previous years — why mess with a good thing,  right? — so no big surprises there.

What that means is a roomy 22″ top tube, a high new school bottom bracket height (13.75″) and a steeper-than-most head tube angle  (75.2 degrees). In other words, an extremely responsive ride that could be the right choice for a rider that is more park oriented (see full specs here).

I would be remiss if I also didn’t mention that the frame, fork and bars are full cro-mo.

Other notables?

170mm cranks and somewhat skinny tires (for this day and age) which clock in at a 24 X1.95″ width.

All in all, a good looking complete from the boys at Colony.





GT’s colorful spin on a classic tire

11 12 2018

GT took the classic good looks of the iconic GT tires of the 80s and have updated them with today’s tech to make them suitable for modern-day riding.

Newly christened as the “Heritage LP-V tire”, these 26″ tires have a lower profile than their old school predecessors for a smooth ride and stronger sidewalls for extra durability.

GT LPV tire fork

Check out the specs:

  • 26 x 2.2”
  • Non-directional “GT” tread
  • Smooth center block
  • Max Pressure: 60 psi
  • Inflated Width: 2.1”
  • Inflated Diameter: 26.25”
  • Weight: 35.84 oz

That’s one good looking tire (and those tanwalls…so nice).

GT wheelie

But wait…there’s more! (note: I’ve been watching too many informercials)

GT brought the heat with these tires…because not only did they make the classic black with tanwall colorway…they’re bringing out a whole grip of colorways!

We’re talking:

  • BlueGT LPV blue
  • RedGT LPV red
  • WhiteGT LPV white
  • PurpleGT LPV purple

Dang, with all these color choices you can really allow your imagination to run wild and let your 80s freestyle freak flag fly.

Definitely stoked on these.

Now, just need to convince GT to make ’em in 24″ versions.





First look: Stolen Bikes Max 29″

29 11 2018

Perhaps this is the first “clear” look at Stolen Bikes‘ new 29″…since we first saw a cloudy pic of a teaser a few weeks ago (A new Stolen 29 sounds fine).

With that being said, we finally  have some more details — and a sharper picture — of what the new addition to the Stolen Bikes lineup will look like.

Dubbed the Max 29″, Stolen says they have taken what they have learned from building their bigger bikes (22, 24 and 26 inch) to make a 29er of equal caliber.

The Max 29″ is full cro-mo, with fully sealed components (with the exception of the pedals) and is built for abuse with double-wall wheels and a 14mm rear axle. Stolen’s parts brand, Fiction ,also covers the tire department with some sporty 29 X 2.50″ rubber.

Specs/Geo-wise, you’re looking at the following:

  • Top Tube Length: 23.25″
  • Chain Stay Length: 18″
  • Head Tube Angle: 71°
  • Seat Tube Angle: 72°
  • Seat Tube Height: 16.15″
  • Bottom Bracket Height: 12″

Color choices are: Black with Chrome Plated bits (pictured above) or Raw with Caribbean Green (not pictured…but I am intrigued by the “Caribbean Green…if only because it reminds me of a Billy Ocean song).

All in all, pretty deece.

No word yet on availability, so hit up Stolen Bikes if this new 29″ piques your interest.





Thanks for 10 years!

22 11 2018

Blogs…they grow up so fast.*

It’s hard to believe that this month marks ten years (!) at this little corner of the internet.

And by golly, it’s still so much fun.

Cruiser Revolution got its start when I found myself researching 24″ cruisers and got frustrated because I had to go from place to place to find information on cruisers.

Then it hit me. If I was going to be doing the “research” anyway I might as well blog about it. Surely some other folks must be interested in the same stuff I am.

Turns out that was true!

It’s difficult to put in to words how I feel about the continued support from y’all. Thank you for the great comments, kind words, rocking the CR stickers and just reading the posts…it means a lot.

I’ve written posts in three different countries, rode with so many cool people all around the US and Canada, and had so much cool stuff come out of this site.

Wouldn’t trade it for the world.

Thanks again,

Ed

P.S. Happy Thanksgiving to everyone celebrating….and good luck and good gates to everyone racing The Grands.

 

*I feel like I’ve used this line before…but it really does seem fitting in this case.





A new Stolen 29 sounds just fine

20 11 2018

Stolen Bikes dropped a little teaser the other day regarding a new bike they have in the works.

The image was a bit cloudy…but the hashtag #29 was a bit more definitive.

Looks the  Saint XLT 24 and the Zeke XLT 26 are gonna have a 29″ big brother!

No word yet on specs, geo or release dates…but my interest has definitely been piqued.





BikeLife wheelies into Bicycling magazine

7 11 2018

Will wheelies save us?

Or more specifically…will they save bike riding?

Bicycling magazine seems to think so:

Forget all our arguing over how to take back the streets from cars. These kids just do it. Their wheelies—all wheelies—command authority. Their wheelies halt traffic and stop pedestrians. Their wheelies celebrate their place in the city, proclaiming that they own the pavement they’re rolling down. Cars deal with it.

In a 6-page article titled Bikelife: The Revolution That’s Taking Back the Streets, Bicycling magazine’s October/November issue takes a look at wheelies and the #BikeLife culture that has breathed new life into this classic biking move (is “trick” the right word here?).

And not only that….how the BikeLife culture is serving as a positive outlet for kids and creating a community that’s all about fun.

The article’s author, a former road racer, seemed a little wistful/jealous of the the BikeLife kids:

These kids had everything I wanted from cycling: Not a contract or designer bike, but friends, unregulated fun, and a small, perfect slice of freedom.

In the end, he succumbs to his more primal cycling urges and gives in to popping some wheelies of his own….because, who doesn’t want to be part of the fun?

Of course, Bicycling is not the only mainstream media outlet to notice the BikeLife movement and give it coverage.

The Wall Street Journal (of all places!) covered it in a 2017 article called, “The BMX Bikes Getting Teens Back on Two Wheels — or One”.  I bet more than a few people were surprised — and stoked — to see the Wall Street Journal write a piece on wheelies.

Closer to home, we saw what the BikeLife movement was capable of back in 2016 when we saw the righteousness of the Philly rideout.

What we found after checking out the rideout footage?

      Big crews, big wheelies and even bigger fun.

The mainstream outlets are catching on now…but you and I both know…it’s always been about that.

 

(Pictures: Bicycling Magazine)