Deep in the heart of Texas

15 09 2016

If all goes to plan, this post should go live roughly at the same time I arrive in Austin, Texas.

As you may recall from my previous missives, Austin is one of my favorite places to visit.

I’m looking forward to breakfast tacos, BBQ and probably some bike-related fun too.

And if the stars align, maybe even a trip out to Walnut Creek.

Gonna be fun.

In the mean time, here’s a few random Austin images for you to peruse.

CMC‘s Liquid cruiser parked outside of Jackalope.

And Buddy busting out on the Beelzebike.

Given that everything’s bigger in Texas, this might also be a good opportunity to check out our new offshoot site, Big and Tall BMX.





Flatland flashback: CMC in ATX

2 10 2015

I spotted a couple mentions of 24″ flatland over on BMX Museum and it got me thinking…

Maybe it’s time to re-up this old clip of CMC busting out some flatland action — on a 24″ DK General Lee(!) — back in 2007.

This was one of the first clips of 24″ flatland I saw in the early days of Cruiser Revolution and it definitely got me stoked.

For a more recent flatland flashback, check out what Joe Cicman and Danny Sirkin have been cooking up the past few years in the TwoFourFlat series.

 





Curbed, dog

22 04 2015

It may seem odd to write about cement curbs on Earth Day (of all days) but in some way it is oddly appropriate.

Earth Day is a day when we–collectively–look at our environment in a different light.

Sure, it’s there every day but how often do we stop and appreciate it?

Now, think of the urban environment.

Curbs, banked surfaces, rails…to the average pedestrian these things barely register.

To a bike rider…well, these things make their eyes light up and stoke their imagination.

Stevil, over at All hail the black market,  wrote about this today –in the context of skating–but I think you’ll agree the same line of thought goes through the mind of any BMXer rolling down the street.

The rad thing about curbs is 99% of the population sees a cement block, if they even see them at all, and generally pay absolutely no mind to them whatsoever. Skateboarders on the other hand, look at them- This thing that’s so impossibly mundane, and see potential for a great deal of fun.

It’s all about perspective.

And the notion that fun…even with something as mundane as a curb…is never far from reach.

cmc-Liquid-manual2(Pic: ATX local, CMC finds himself some fun with a curb manual)





A new Liquid Feedback frame on the way?

14 06 2013

Liquid Bikes is dropping hints that an updated Liquid Feedback frame might be on the way.

The hints started trickling in early last week with a teaser shot of what they called “a next generation Liquid Feedback prototype frame.”

Proto-next gen Liquid Feedback frame

That was quickly followed a few days later with a pic of it all built up.

Liquid Feedback next gen build

Accompanying the photo was the following write-up:

Liquid Bikes is excited to announce that we’re teaming up with our California brothers – Solid BMX. Hand crafted in California… just like the trails. More info, details, and availability coming soon!

This is pretty exciting news, given that Liquid has been on a bit of a hiatus since selling out of the last of its frames a while back.

A favorite among big wheel bad-asses like Buddy Sardenga, CMC and owner/operator, Jeremy Combs, it was sad to see the availability of Liquid Feedback frames dry up some time ago.

Thankfully, it appears that dry spell is about to change and Liquid frames are going to start flowing back to the public very soon.

Looking forward to hearing more about this story as it develops.





New InDust Cuatro 24 looks interesting

21 11 2011

Just spotted this in a Ridemonkey thread tonight….CMC‘s new InDust Cuatro 24 prototype build.

Made by Stout Bikes in Texas, and billed as “a 24 inch BMX frame with aggressive geometry built for the aggressive rider”, this looks like one serious shredding machine.

Frame specs (according to the Ridemonkey thread, may not be final):

  • 22 3/8″ top tube
  • 14 3/8″ chain stay (slammed)
  • 13″ (approx.) bottom bracket
  • 74-74.5 degree head angle (not confirmed)
  • 4130 chromoly

Not sure what the plans are for a production run of these but I’m definitely interested in hearing more about this frame.

If you want to find out more about the InDust Cuarto, check out the InDust site or the related Ridemonkey thread.





No brakes, no worries

24 08 2011

Received an email from Cullen (aka CMC) recently that simply said,

“Nice to see some smooth low-key brakeless 24″ riding”

with a link to this Daniel Ziller video:

Vodpod videos no longer available.

Kinda makes you want to drop what you’re doing and go ride, doesn’t it?





Go with the flow

24 06 2011

Spotted this pic on the Liquid Bikes Facebook page and had to post it.

It had the caption, “Check out Cullen flowing like…Liquid.”

Park looks so fun.





A DIY complete: the best of both worlds?

30 09 2010

With the spec on complete bikes consistently getting better year after year, it’s often hard to justify spending the dollars on a custom build.

But what happens when the frame you really want is available in frame only?

Or maybe the aftermarket version of the frame on the complete is available in a bigger size…one more suited to your lanky body?

What to do?

If money’s tight you may go with the complete but feel you compromised in a way. Alternatively, if you decide money be damned, you’re going to build the bike you want from the ground up you may end up feeling like you overpaid for your bike. Another route is to transfer your old parts to the new frame but then you miss out on the pleasure of having new parts to go with your new frame.

Maybe there’s another way.

The Do-It-Yourself (DIY) complete

With the recent hype about the new 2011 bikes and parts, many people forget this is also the time that bike shops and mail order companies are marking down their “old” 2010 stock.

I’ve been thinking about getting an S&M 38 special or a Standard 125r for racing. If JensonUSA marks down some of their race cruiser completes down 40- 50% like they did last year…well, then my dream of getting a Cro-mo race complete suddenly looks within reach. I’ll just transfer the parts over to the new frame.  If I turn around and sell the frame from the complete it becomes even more affordable.

If a long, trails-oriented frame is in your sights, you’ve probably considered the Liquid Feedback frame. If you want a “complete” version though, you’ll have to take matters into your own hands.  Luckily, building your own complete Liquid 24 isn’t hard at all. In fact, CMC advises someone in this thread on a Pinkbike forum to do just that. He suggests picking up a marked down We the People Avenger and transferring the parts over to the Liquid…it’s all compatible and it’s hard to beat the parts that come standard on the 2010 Avenger.

CMC manual on Liquid 24

A DIY Liquid could get you manualling like CMC in no time

The Craigslist DIY Complete

If these tough economic times have hit you hard or you just like a really good deal you can take this same approach using Craigslist or eBay.

Check out what artist Chris Piascik did:

I hunted on Craigslist for a couple weeks and found a Haro cruiser and a Standard 125R cruiser frame. The Standard frame was fantastic (as all their bikes are) and the Haro was complete. I did the only reasonable thing I could think of—I bought both. I moved all of the Haro parts over to the Standard and then put the Haro frame back on Craigslist.

Of course, because Chris is an artist, he had the bike totally tricked out with some original art work.

Check out Chris’s flickr stream for more cool shots of his tricked out Standard 125r.

Will 2011 be the year of the DIY complete?

So what do you think?

Is this something you would try?

I’m certainly thinking about it.





Liquid frames aren’t just for the trails

11 08 2010

To date most of the pictures and webclips featuring Liquid Bikes have been pretty trails-oriented.

Made me kind of curious to see how it would handle in the street and in skateparks.

I guess I can stop wondering.

CMC from Austin shows that, with a couple of pegs thrown on, the Liquid Feedback becomes a capable street/park machine. (Photos originally posted on ridemonkey.com)

Check out the guy on the 20″ craning his neck to get a look.

Yes my friend, things really are more fun on a 24.