Advertisements

Freakishly big freestyler really flies

29 09 2017

When we learned that GT was upsizing the Pro Performer to a 29″ version for 2018…we wondered (or should I say doubted) if people were ready for a such a big freestyle bike.

(It does seem freakishly big for a freestyle bike)

Yet, if my Instagram feed over the last few days is any indication, it looks like they are.

Case in point, Mark Flip of Albes BMX busting out a decade aboard the 29er earlier this week.

Then later in the week, the artist/rider Chris Piascik shows up with some 29″ radness of his own.

This Greg Hill style tuck is all sorts of good!

I guess it just goes to show that no wheel size has a monopoly on radness.

Big wheels keep on turning!

Advertisements




I want action

25 02 2015

Although I can get as bike-nerdy as the next guy looking at a custom-built bike, I think seeing that same bike doing what it is designed to do–in action–is that much cooler.

action graphicSo imagine how stoked I was to find a picture of the custom 26″ Trail Boss, that Chris Piascik had built by Standard Bykes, in this great action shot over at BMX Museum.

Chris Piascik tuck on 26in Trail BossA classic tuck for extra style points!

Hopefully we’ll more shots of this cool bike in action in the future.

Now, if you’ll excuse me…I have to get that dreadful I want action Poison tune out of my head.





Stop the presses: a 26″ custom Trail Boss

29 07 2014

Hot damn…this is one awesome looking bike.

Standard Bykes built up this custom 26″ Trail Boss for artist Chris Piascik and featured it a short while ago on their Facebook feed.

I’m actually kinda speechless about this bike, I’m digging on it so hard.

Chris Piascik's custom 26in Trail Boss(pic from Standard Bykes Facebook feed)

I don’t have all the particulars on it, geo-wise, but Standard has said in the comments regarding this bike that:

If we get a few guys into ordering these we’ll do a “stock” run of them…which means regular stock pricing!

Stock pricing? This bike is getting more tempting by the minute.

I have to stop looking at the picture.





A DIY complete: the best of both worlds?

30 09 2010

With the spec on complete bikes consistently getting better year after year, it’s often hard to justify spending the dollars on a custom build.

But what happens when the frame you really want is available in frame only?

Or maybe the aftermarket version of the frame on the complete is available in a bigger size…one more suited to your lanky body?

What to do?

If money’s tight you may go with the complete but feel you compromised in a way. Alternatively, if you decide money be damned, you’re going to build the bike you want from the ground up you may end up feeling like you overpaid for your bike. Another route is to transfer your old parts to the new frame but then you miss out on the pleasure of having new parts to go with your new frame.

Maybe there’s another way.

The Do-It-Yourself (DIY) complete

With the recent hype about the new 2011 bikes and parts, many people forget this is also the time that bike shops and mail order companies are marking down their “old” 2010 stock.

I’ve been thinking about getting an S&M 38 special or a Standard 125r for racing. If JensonUSA marks down some of their race cruiser completes down 40- 50% like they did last year…well, then my dream of getting a Cro-mo race complete suddenly looks within reach. I’ll just transfer the parts over to the new frame.  If I turn around and sell the frame from the complete it becomes even more affordable.

If a long, trails-oriented frame is in your sights, you’ve probably considered the Liquid Feedback frame. If you want a “complete” version though, you’ll have to take matters into your own hands.  Luckily, building your own complete Liquid 24 isn’t hard at all. In fact, CMC advises someone in this thread on a Pinkbike forum to do just that. He suggests picking up a marked down We the People Avenger and transferring the parts over to the Liquid…it’s all compatible and it’s hard to beat the parts that come standard on the 2010 Avenger.

CMC manual on Liquid 24

A DIY Liquid could get you manualling like CMC in no time

The Craigslist DIY Complete

If these tough economic times have hit you hard or you just like a really good deal you can take this same approach using Craigslist or eBay.

Check out what artist Chris Piascik did:

I hunted on Craigslist for a couple weeks and found a Haro cruiser and a Standard 125R cruiser frame. The Standard frame was fantastic (as all their bikes are) and the Haro was complete. I did the only reasonable thing I could think of—I bought both. I moved all of the Haro parts over to the Standard and then put the Haro frame back on Craigslist.

Of course, because Chris is an artist, he had the bike totally tricked out with some original art work.

Check out Chris’s flickr stream for more cool shots of his tricked out Standard 125r.

Will 2011 be the year of the DIY complete?

So what do you think?

Is this something you would try?

I’m certainly thinking about it.