Spring Fling Sneak Peeks

3 04 2017

The annual “Spring Fling” happened down in Florida this past weekend and from all indications it looked like it was off the hook (Do people still say that?).

In addition to bringing together a bunch of rowdy BMXers, it was also where quite a few 2018 sneak peeks went down.

SE bikesTodd Lyons brought a bunch of cruisers from their yet-to-be-released lineup and he wasn’t shy about showing them off.

Some bikes have changed in size for 2018, like the Mike Buff Looptail…which now rolls out with 29″ wheels…

We went big this year!๐ŸŽ‰๐Ÿ’ช๐Ÿฝ๐ŸŽ‰ #mikebuff #bigripper #29weekspregnant @mikebuff_

A post shared by Todd Lyons (@toddlyons) on

…and the Stu Thomsen STR…which is now in a available in a 26″ version.

The Cycle Squad Maniacs were on hand showcasing the new eye-popping SE Factory Squad threads. (You’re not going to miss this race kit!)

Todd Lyons and rrdblocks also showcased the wheelie proficiency of the new Big Flyers (available in two different colorways).

I think I’m most stoked on the STR-26…or maybe it’s just that picture of Stompin’ Stu roosting on it!

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Meeting up and catching up

30 09 2016

Beyond all the fancy bikes, accessories and industry news at Interbike, one of the best parts of the whole shindig is who you run into over the course of the show.

This year had some noteworthy interactions for sure.

Upon entering the conference floor, I paused at the Park Tool booth and heard a distinctive voice that had been ingrained in my subconscious from repeated viewings of BMX Plus! magazine’s video, Rad TV. It was none other than BMX photographer extraordinaire, John Ker.

I turned around and spotted him immediately…and the 14-year old version of myself suddenly popped into my head and started going crazy…I had to go talk to him.

john-ker

I’m pretty sure I nerded out the whole conversation but he was extremely gracious and I was glad I got to meet the man behind so many iconic bmx images.

This boded well for the rest of the show.

Making my way through the show I came upon the SE booth.

And again, the 14-version of myself had returned to take over my brain. In the booth alongside SE’s Todd Lyons, were 80s mega-stars: Mike Buff and Stu Thomsen.

buff-lyons-stu-interbike

Holy Cow.

They were signing baseball card-style cards of themselves for anybody that would stop by.

I have to say I’m pretty stoked with this autographed card.

buff-trading-card-interbike

Then a little while later, with the Interbike floorplan map in my face, struggling to find out which way to go next, I ran into Joseph Gallacher.

joseph-gallacher

Joseph is the impresario behind Mill Town Cycle (and heavily involved with the Milton BMX track back home) so it was cool to run into him and get a few minutes to chat…especially since both of us were unaware that we would both be in town for the event.

The next person I ran into was Adam Hendershot.

Adam’s a good friend that has recently moved out west, got himself married and started to race cruiser (he’s been busy).

He mentioned that he would be in town but I wasn’t expecting to see him until the next day.

Turns out he got in early and hit the show right away. Ofย  course, we end up bumping into each other…again while I was trying to figure out the Interbike floorplan.

We had good chat and then he was off to the SE booth.

adam-and-se-boys

(That’s him in the middle…note the super-stylish Chicken & Waffles Vans shoes.)

If you’ve been following Todd Lyon’s social media feeds, you’re probably already familiar with Adam’s back.

adam-hendershots-back

He reps SE and BMX hard!

Then toward the end of the show, I was checking my phone when I someone that I was hoping to run into, walking up to me…Travis Engel of Commonground Bikes.

travis-engel

I had seen that he was at the Outdoor Demo, but I wasn’t sure if he would be at the show.

He was (obviously).

If you saw the Something new, something dusty post, you can see the type of bike that Travis was already promoting well before S&M created their prototype.

We had a good chat and I’m stoked that we got a chance to meet up.

All in all, a good show in term of random meetups and pleasant surprises.

Fist bumps & high fives to y’all.

 

*As you may have noticed, not all of these photos were taken at Interbike…I think I got too caught up in the conversations to remember to snap pictures of everyone.

 

 





When worlds collide

26 05 2016

SE has done a great job of promoting its 26″ Fat Ripper. They’ve even gone so far as to drop an edit of Todd Lyons letting his freak flag fly — riding oneย  in a wild web edit.

More recently, they’ve teamed up with BMX legend, Mike Buff, to release a Mike Buff tribute PK Ripper.

It’s a real looker…and certainly evokes the look of the early days of BMX, a time when Buff and RL ruled the freestyle scene.

Now, just to mix things up a little….

Buff and SE took a Fat Ripper and customized it to give it the look of the Mike Buff tribute PK Ripper.

MikeBuff Fat Ripper

The result?

Pretty fresh.

(Frankly, the only way this could be more eye-catching would be if they somehow figured out a way to make some Fat 26″ TUFF Wheels!)

 





Scoping out the SE STR-29

5 04 2016

Well, the cat’s out of the bag.

Todd Lyons had been dropping hints leading up to the Spring Fling in Florida (that happened this past weekend).

He had something special that he wanted to showcase.

And he brought Stu Thomsen along for the occasion.

That “something” was the reintroduction of the STR (Stu’s signature frame back in the day).

But this wasn’t just a simple re-pop…this STR has evolved!

This STR is a 29-incher!

(Hence the name – STR-29.)

SE STR-29 Stu & BuffThat’s Stu and the STR-29 on the right (Who’s that guy on the left? He looks pretty Buff)

The frame design is pretty trick.

The double down-tubes begin at the head tube, wrap underneath the bottom bracket, continue around the looptail (!) rear dropouts and then connect again on the top tube.

SE STR-29 bottomWhen I shared the first pic of the STR-29 on the CR Facebook page, a couple people questioned the 29″ size.

I kinda wondered about it too.

Then I remembered a comment I had seen in the past (from The Mayor of Hollywood, perhaps?) that the 29″ Big Ripper was an awesome wheelie machine.

No sooner had that thought crossed my mind…this picture popped up on my feed.

SE STR-29 Stu & DBlocks wheelie actionStu and DBlocks getting their wheelie on.

It appears that my suspicions that the STR-29 being an extraordinary wheelie machine were confirmed.

I’m sure we’re going to be hearing more about the SE STR-29 in the weeks and months ahead.

(Pictures: Todd Lyons/SE)





The nerd herd: RL & Buff

12 06 2014

A staple in the legendary 80s BMX mag, BMX Action, RL Osborn and Mike Buff could always be counted on for getting rad and doing whatever it took for a great photo.

According to 23mag.com,

As the โ€œNerd herdโ€, R.L. & Buff were vital in setting BMX trends during the 80โ€™s, from jumping styles in bike tests to the 4×4 vehicle craze, to clothing fashions and hairdos.

Whether that meant Buff hitting the quarterpipe on a Robinson 24 (“a serious race bike”)

robinsonprocruisertestOr RL, laying down some serious roost in this two-page shot for a 24 shootout, they brought the heat every month.

rlcruiserAnd, with their riding captured by the equally legendary photographer/editor Bob Osborn, these photographs really stand the test of time.

Not a bad way to spend this “throwback thursday”, thinking back to this era and the impact these dudes had on it.

 





Friday flashback

15 07 2011

Back in the 80s,ย  freestyle-oriented 24″ bikes just weren’t available.ย  The only 24″ cruisers on the market were pure race machines.

Fortunately, that didn’t stop theย  BMX Action test team of RL Osborn and Mike Buff from taking the race bikes they were testing, like the Robinson 24″ Pro Racer, out to the quarter-pipe to “get better idea of their handling characteristics.”

Check out this spread of Mike Buff from the November 1983 edition of BMX Action. Pure style!

It would be more than a decade after this magazine came out before freestyle/jumping oriented cruisers would make their entrance to the BMX world. Could pictures like this have played a part in planting the seed? Makes me wonder…

If you’re into this type of “back in the day” stuff, be sure to check out Ed Koenning’s excellent, When are you going to get a real bike? blog. A must read, especially if you were a typical BMX kid in the 80s and lived for the day each month when the new issues of BMX Action and BMX Plus! would hit the newstand.