Advertisements

Are you ready for the Truth?

21 08 2015

I got the heads up recently about a small rider-owned company called Truth BMX Products.

Based out of Maryland, the company has been around for just under a year and is run by two brothers, Eric and Tony Spears.

In addition to a pretty wide assortment of components, the company has some pretty cool 24″ race frames in their product lineup (with 26″ versions planned in the coming months).

Truth Blue

The specs for the PRO 24 Main Event frame are:

  • Top tube: 21.5″
  • Chainstay: 15.35″
  • Head Angle: 73.5 degrees
  • Seat Angle: 70 degrees

A Pro XL 24 frame is also available with a 22″ top tube (all other specs the same as above).

Truth Blk

All the frames are made out of 6061-T6 Aluminum.

Watch for these to become available in the next few weeks.

Check out truthbmxproducts.com for more details about frame colors, their parts lineup and a bunch of other race-y stuff.

Advertisements




Dirt for Dummies – Jon Faure jumping tips

22 12 2011

If you’re new to dirt jumping or your skills are just a little rusty, Jon Faure has some pointers for you in his new video, “How to ride dirt jumps when you suck.”

Jon is 47-year old rider with great dirt jumping skills that only got into the BMX in his late 30s.

In this video, he not only provides some great dirt jumping tips, he even talks about why he prefers a 24″ bike over hard tail MTBs and 20″ BMX bikes. Definitely worth watching.

Check it out.

Vodpod videos no longer available.




People of Walmart…your 24″ is here

19 10 2011

Less than a decade ago, if you were looking for serious, non-race 24″ cruiser your choices were few and far between.

If you wanted a 24″ bike that would take some abuse, it usually meant you were riding either a Haro Backtrail 24 or the DK General Lee.

Today, you may have noticed (especially if you’re a regular reader of this site) that the choices for non-race 24″ cruisers are a little deeper.  And perhaps fittingly, those two old workhorses, the Backtrail and the General Lee were dropped from their respective company’s lineups.

But just like those ol’ Duke Boys in a car chase with Roscoe P. Coltrane, the General Lee was a bike that couldn’t be kept down. It’s resurfaced, albeit in a slightly different incarnation and to some sometimes heated BMX forum discussion in, of all places, Walmart!

Do Bo and Luke Duke know what happened to the General Lee?

Word on the street is that Huffy bought out DK and, in addition to their higher-end bikes and parts, they are offering a small lineup of race and freestyle bikes in Walmart.

This version of the General Lee is  hi-ten steel with Chro-mo 3-piece cranks…a far cry of it’s original completely Chro-mo version…but priced accordingly, at $179 (US).

Some people are burning up the forums saying this is a travesty.

I dunno. Remember the Subrosa Salvador 24 from last year? That was a hi-ten bike with chro-mo cranks priced at $404! That to me, was  more of an outrage. At least this bike is priced appropriately and sold in a place that makes sense.

Would Uncle Jesse approve?

I can see a Dad picking one of these up, at the same time he’s picking out a first bike for his son or daughter. Who knows, after jumping  curb cuts, popping a few wheelies and just having fun on his $179 bike, he’ll decide to upgrade to something a little better at his local bike shop. And there he’ll see a brand he recognizes but be something much better suited to heavy-duty riding.

What do you think about DK bikes showing up at Walmart?

Something good?

Or something bad?

For complete specs, check out Walmart’s page.

For more info on all the Dukes of Hazzard references in this post, click here.





For real, too much steel

19 10 2010

As you may have gathered from my previous posts, I’m not afraid to join in the refrain of “steel is real” when people debate the pros and cons of frame/fork materials. That being said, it kind of goes without saying that, in these situations, I’m talking about chro-moly not hi-tensile steel.

Sure, I get low-end completes may have to scrimp a bit and go with tri-moly or main tube chro-moly frames (the rest being steel) and steel bars. Compromises have to be made somewhere.

What I have difficulty in understanding is a hard-core BMX company putting out a complete that is high-tensile steel throughout.

Like Subrosa.

The 24″ Subrosa Salvador cruiser comes standard with high-ten frame, fork and bars. The geometry and components seem pretty good…seemingly designed for serious riding…yet the frame material seems better suited to a department store bike.

What’s bizarre is that it’s spec’ed with chro-moly cranks!

Well, thank goodness for that.

Because once you’ve broken the frame, bent the forks and snapped the bars you’ll at least have a solid pair of cranks beneath you to carry you home.

If this was part of a 24″ lineup I would kind of get it (sort of) but to have this as the sole 24″ offering from a company that should know better is pretty disappointing.





It’s time to bring cro-mo back to racing

27 05 2010

Steel is real. It’s a refrain you’ll hear time and time again in the forums from die-hard cro-mo fans. And while there are cro-mo race options out there…like S&M, Supercross, Standard and CycleCraft, by and large, they are available in frame and fork only.

Why doesn’t anyone offer a cro-mo race complete?

Back in the day, a complete cro-mo race cruiser was easy to find. Not so anymore. Pure race machines are pretty much all aluminum these days.

Is it time to bring the complete cro-mo 24 race cruiser back?

I think so.

And there are a number of reasons why.

Versatility: Sure an aluminum bike might be fine for the track, pump track and light trails….but would you trust it anywhere else? Bigger trails? An impromptu session at the skatepark? Probably not. A cro-mo bike would let you ride in any of these situations with confidence. Sure, some people have a second bike for this very reason but many people do not have this luxury.

Better value: A good cro-mo bike can easily outlast an aluminum bike. With the way the economy is these days a bike that lasts just makes good sense. And if you’re a Dad just swinging a leg over a 24 for the first time (or after a long layoff from the sport) a little bit of the “give” that 4130 has will be welcome.  If your kid decides to quit racing and just ride trails and park? No problem, the cro-mo bike will take you to the park or trails in style.

Pent up demand: With such a vocal group on the internet forums, a good cro-mo race complete would probably sell like hotcakes.

While I don’t expect S&M to suddenly jump into the complete market, certainly the Fit CR24, with a couple of tweaks to the geometry (and maybe the components) could be offered as a race version (just as an example…not to pick on S&M/Fit). I think there’s a market out there and whoever decides to take the plunge will be pleasantly surprised.

It’s time for race bike manufacturers to get back to their roots…it’s time once again, to sell the metal.

David Frid knows steel is real. He rocks one of the nicest 38 Specials out there in the O-Cup race series.






Redline runs 2-page Proline 24 ad

13 01 2010

Flipping through the latest edition of BMX Plus! recently, I was pleasantly surprised to find a two-page ad for the Redline Proline 24.

So many companies give short shrift to 24s in their ads,  it’s nice to see Redline step up and recognize that cruiser riders want to see “their” bikes in the BMX mags too. For Redline to do so in a two-page spread makes me respect them even more.

What’s more, I love that they chose the Proline 24 over the Flight 24 for the ad. While the Flight 24 is certainly a sought after bike for the hardcore race crowd (with factory Answer Scythe forks, etc.) the Proline 24 is a simple, well-spec’d bike that works: Chromo forks, Redline Flight cranks…everything you need to win races or ride trails…nothing too fancy, but nothing that needs replacing either.

Even though I’m kind of surprised it wasn’t offered in red, or that cool bronze-y gold of last year, I find that this blue version is growing on me. Great job, Redline.

Respect.