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GT’s colorful spin on a classic tire

11 12 2018

GT took the classic good looks of the iconic GT tires of the 80s and have updated them with today’s tech to make them suitable for modern-day riding.

Newly christened as the “Heritage LP-V tire”, these 26″ tires have a lower profile than their old school predecessors for a smooth ride and stronger sidewalls for extra durability.

GT LPV tire fork

Check out the specs:

  • 26 x 2.2”
  • Non-directional “GT” tread
  • Smooth center block
  • Max Pressure: 60 psi
  • Inflated Width: 2.1”
  • Inflated Diameter: 26.25”
  • Weight: 35.84 oz

That’s one good looking tire (and those tanwalls…so nice).

GT wheelie

But wait…there’s more! (note: I’ve been watching too many informercials)

GT brought the heat with these tires…because not only did they make the classic black with tanwall colorway…they’re bringing out a whole grip of colorways!

We’re talking:

  • BlueGT LPV blue
  • RedGT LPV red
  • WhiteGT LPV white
  • PurpleGT LPV purple

Dang, with all these color choices you can really allow your imagination to run wild and let your 80s freestyle freak flag fly.

Definitely stoked on these.

Now, just need to convince GT to make ’em in 24″ versions.

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Send me an angel? New movie gets Rad

3 01 2014

It’s perhaps one of the oddest pop-cultural references to the movie RAD in recent memory.

In a new movie called Coffee Town (out now on pay-per-view)  a character  experiments with a recreational pharmaceutical and finds himself in a place “where love can only be expressed by BMX freestyle”…that is, the dance scene from the movie RAD. You know, the one that embedded the song Send me an angel into your memory banks like every BMX kid that came of age in the 80s.

Truly weird and cool at the same time.

Bonus info: Gabe Weed did the “stunt work” for this clip.

Rad dance scene redux





Friday flashback

15 07 2011

Back in the 80s,  freestyle-oriented 24″ bikes just weren’t available.  The only 24″ cruisers on the market were pure race machines.

Fortunately, that didn’t stop the  BMX Action test team of RL Osborn and Mike Buff from taking the race bikes they were testing, like the Robinson 24″ Pro Racer, out to the quarter-pipe to “get better idea of their handling characteristics.”

Check out this spread of Mike Buff from the November 1983 edition of BMX Action. Pure style!

It would be more than a decade after this magazine came out before freestyle/jumping oriented cruisers would make their entrance to the BMX world. Could pictures like this have played a part in planting the seed? Makes me wonder…

If you’re into this type of “back in the day” stuff, be sure to check out Ed Koenning’s excellent, When are you going to get a real bike? blog. A must read, especially if you were a typical BMX kid in the 80s and lived for the day each month when the new issues of BMX Action and BMX Plus! would hit the newstand.





Taking it back to the old school

29 04 2009

With all the hype recently about custom bikes/frames/parts, it’s easy to forget the simple, DIY ways to customize your bike. Paint, some new parts and stickers can go a long way to personalize your bike or make an old bike look like new. In some cases, it can even make a new school bike look old school. Take this Haro Nyquist Backtrail 24; some carefully chosen parts, paint and stickers make it feel like we’ve stepped back into the mid-80s. You can almost imagine Rich Sigur dropping into the Pipeline on this.

24haroretro004