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Redline returns with some retro

9 10 2018

That retro feeling is strong my friends.

As mentioned in the previous post about Schwinn’s foray into the retro cruiser scene (is that the right word?), all the legacy BMX brands seem to be getting in on that sweet retro action.

The brand with arguably the biggest legacy in BMX, Redline is apparently no different.

Introducing the the RL-275.


Redline’s approach is a bit different though.

Taking some cues from SE, with bikes like the FAT Ripper , and DMR, with bikes like the Wrath,…Redline is blurring the lines a bit between MTB and MTB.

According to Redline:

This BMX bike for adults looks like a classic BMX cruiser, until you take a gander at the Tektro mechanical disc brakes and those ultra fat  3-inch wide tires mounted on 27.5 Plus size rims.

The old school BMX graphics and handlebars, along with the MTB-ish spec is definitely an interesting combo.

Here’s a breakdown of the key features:

  • Aluminum frame and full chromoly fork
  • Classic Flight cranks (chrome finish with retro decals)
  • Aluminum rims with V Speedster 27.5×3.0 inch tires (gumwall)
  • Retro Double Bend handlebar
  • Monster Fat Padded Pivotal Seat
  • Monster ultra low profile pedals

In terms of Geo, you’re looking at the following:

  • Top Tube: 23″.2
  • Head Angle: 71˚
  • Seat Angle: 73˚
  • Bottom Bracket Height: 12″
  • Chain Stay: 17.9″
  • Stand Over: 28.9″

The RL-275 looks equally suited for cruising the streets or hitting some sweet jumps (or at least some curb cuts on the way to the corner store).

Actually, with those disc brakes…you could really get your endo game on lock…and really, who doesn’t love to bust out a good endo once and a while?

 

(Pics: Redline)

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Would Cru make the same choice today?

10 08 2011

In a key plot point in the movie Rad, Cru Jones makes the life-changing decision to postpone taking his SATs to take part in the big race at Helltrack. He does it because he thinks he’s got a chance at winning against all the “factory hot shots”.

Did he make the right choice?

It seemed like the right idea at the time. Factory BMX racers seemed to have it all back in the 80s. Driving Porsches, international travel, BMX Action magazine covers…you name it. They were living the high life.

Winning the big race would be Cru’s ticket to living the dream.

But today? I’m not so sure skipping the SATs would’ve been the right choice.

Check out the check that Denzel Stein, Redline factory hotshot, is holding for a recent win…$1400.

Compare this with the check that Team Kachinsky (Brian Kachinsky, Corey Martinez, Sean Sexton and Will Stroud) is holding after a win at the recent Nike 6.0 contest…$14,000. (Sure it’s split 4 ways…but c’mon that’s a much sweeter payday.)

Today, he probably would’ve been wise to skip the race altogether and focus on perfecting his bicycle boogie skills.






BMX Plus runs hot and cold on 24s

26 04 2010

Although he isn’t the editor anymore,  I will probably always think of John Ker as the face of BMX Plus! magazine. And now because of his magazine’s seemingly hot and cold treatment of cruisers in recent months I feel compelled to write him this (admittedly tongue-in-cheek)  “Dear John” letter.

John Ker: no love for the 24?

Dear John,

I thought we really had something. After not reading your magazine in what seemed like forever, I picked up your magazine at the local store and noticed you had changed over the years. No longer were you associating with Radical Rick or doing “who’s radder” features….you were actually showing some honest to goodness riding once in a while. More importantly, you showed some love for the cruiser with a couple of 24″ bike tests in 2009.

Your advertisers seemed to have noticed this too. One of them rewarded you with not one, but two 2-page ads for their cruisers.

But your self-destructive nature got the best of you, didn’t it? Out of nowhere in your April issue, you featured an article called Cruising into Oblivion: The Death of the 24.

How could you do this? Both to our fledgling relationship and to your advertisers? For the love of God, there’s a 2-page ad for Redline‘s top-of-the-line Flight 24 in the very same issue that you say 24s are cruising into oblivion!

It makes me so mad…and I imagine Redline isn’t any happier. I wrote a post about it, hoping to salvage things, to help you see the error of your ways and to let you know that 24s are not dead yet. After that I didn’t hear from you for a month.

Now all of sudden, in the June issue it seems that the ‘love’ is back with a 10-page race cruiser shootout. While it’s a grand gesture, after declaring our relationship essentially over, to try to win me back with a 10-page article, it seems just a little to late. I guess you don’t know what you’ve got till it’s gone, right?

I know what you’re going to say, that you’ve changed.

But I’m not sure if I can bury the hatchet just yet. I think you’ll have to prove to me that you want this relationship to work.

How you ask?

A full-on 24″ freestyle cruiser shootout.

I think that’s what it will take to win me back.

So John, what do you say?





The story of Stompin’ Stu Thomsen

6 11 2009

“He was like a god.”

former Pro BMX racer Ronnie Anderson

Finally had a chance to see Stompin’ Stu, The Story of BMX Legend Stu Thomsen DVD last night and I have to say I’m stoked. I got into BMX back in ’80s when the the rivalry between Stu and Greg Hill was at its peak. BMX racing was huge at the time and Stu was larger than life.

But he was more than an awesome racer…he was a great dirt jumper that also rode skatepark sections that intimidated people like Bob Haro.

The DVD lets you relive some of the epic battles he had on the track and also see how he battled and overcame prostate cancer. This is guy that can still turn up at the NBL Grand Nationals and kick ass in the 50-54 cruiser class. And this is not some low-to-the ground racer, Stu still likes to jump!

Stompin Stu NBL Grands

 

You should totally check out this DVD.

The extras with Linn Kastan (founder of Redline Bicycles) talking about how parts were developed are the icing on the cake.